BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture 1st Oct 2015

Yesterday the Aberdeen branch of the BCS (online) hosted two lectures by Dr. Mark Baldwin about the Enigma machine titled “The Codebreakers: Enigma, Bletchley Park & the Battle of the Atlantic”. The first talk of the day was held at the Satrosphere Science Centre to an audience of about 25 persons mainly members of the BCS. The second public talk was held at the Sir Ian Wood Building, Robert Gordon University to an audience of some 65 persons. The talk began around 18:30 and concluded around 20:20 with the opportunity for questions and a viewing of some World War 2 Enigma machines and also a modern day simulation that one could build for around £120stg.

It was really quite fascinating to hear to story of its evolution beginning around the time of World War 1 and of its evolution over a twenty year period. In parallel was the story of what began in the early 1930’s on “breaking” the Enigma ciphers.

A very interesting graph was displayed during the a discussion on the Battle of the Atlantic showing the monthly merchant shipping losses in thousands of tonnes. One could see some key points in time that coincided with the acquisition of hardware / code books and the reduction in shipping losses shortly thereafter. In addition one could also see the increase in losses when the Enigma machine went from three rotors to four.

It was really interesting to learn about the inner workings of the machine focusing in on the wiring configuration and mechanical operations that allowed for a different encoded letter be generated every time you pressed the same input key. The mechanism by how it works is surprisingly simple, essentially just creating a simple loop through which current can flow – thereby illuminating a small bulb. It was really amazing to see that for all of its simplicity it could generate a huge number of possible outcomes – each rotor generating 26 factorial combinations which in turn was magnified by a front panel allowing one to wire up one particular letter with another.

It was also really great to see up close the actual Enigma machine that appeared roughly 10 minutes into the film “The Imitation Game” (imdb), (trailer). The following links may give you some further information about Enigma should you wish to know more: (online), (online), (online).

The images below may be found in the following flickr photo album (online).

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

BCS Aberdeen Enigma Lecture

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UK Computer Science Funding REF 2014 Analysis

In REF 2014 eighty nine institutions were submitted to the Computer Science and Informatics subject area. The analysis below examines the data made available at the (REF Results Webpage – UoA 11) and takes note of the total funding pot for each year 2008/9 to 2012/3. This is broken down by institution type, and country.

Total Research Income

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
England £113,747,632 £114,851,075 £117,463,599 £120,655,467 £124,889,051
Scotland £24,967,458 £24,284,379 £23,235,215 £21,158,815 £24,196,970
Wales £5,521,097 £5,771,539 £6,138,836 £5,813,848 £5,324,725
Ulster £4,880,387 £5,224,918 £6,397,775 £4,363,975 £4,416,940
Total £149,116,574 £150,131,911 £153,235,425 £151,992,105 £158,827,686

The table below outlines the number of universities submitted in each location and the type of institution. As can be seen England had the majority of university submissions at 69, followed by Scotland at 12, Wales at 6 and Ulster with 2, giving a total of 89 submissions. The largest group of institution type submissions was from Post-92 universities at 37, then followed with 30 from a selection of redbrick / glass plate type institutions, and the remaining 22 submissions from Russell Group institutions. One may also see the number of submitted staff based on institution type. As can be seen a total of 2158 staff were submitted to REF (Category A & C).

Location Submissions Institution Type Institutions Staff Submissions
England 69 Russell Group 22 912
Scotland 12 Post-92 37 546
Wales 6 Other 30 700
Ulster 2
Sector Total 89 89  2158

Calculating the average across each location and the computer science sector as a whole yields the table below. Looking at the figures for the 2012/13 academic year one can see that Ulster had the greatest average research income (A little over £2200K) – although it does have just two submitted institutions. Wales has the lowest average at a little under £900K. The total income at £158.8M averages out across the 89 universities to £1785K per School\Department.

2008-09 2009-10  2010-11 2011-12  2012-13
England £1,648,516 £1,664,508 £1,702,371 £1,748,630 £1,809,986
Scotland £2,080,622 £2,023,698 £1,936,268 £1,763,235 £2,016,414
Wales £920,183 £961,923 £1,023,139 £968,975 £887,454
Ulster £2,440,194 £2,612,459 £3,198,888 £2,181,988 £2,208,470
Sector Average £1,675,467 £1,686,875 £1,721,746 £1,707,776 £1,784,581

The 22 Russell Group universities brought in  over £101M for the 2012/13 academic year, this accounts for 64% of the total income across all 89 institutions, thereby leaving £57M to be distributed across the remaining 67 schools\departments. As seen in the table below.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
Russell Group Totals £93,103,342 £91,483,897 £89,962,574 £93,528,618 £101,664,055
Remaining Income £56,013,232 £58,648,014 £63,272,851 £58,463,487 £57,163,631

This £57M can be further broken down by the distribution of same between the Post-92 institutions and the rest, as detailed below. The other 30 institutions for the 2012/13 year were awarded 39.7% the income of the Russell Group institutions, with the 37 Post-92 institutions receiving just 16.5% in comparison to the Russell Group.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
Others £41,748,295 £43,056,467 £46,610,949 £41,427,815 £40,409,460
Post 92 £14,264,937 £15,591,547 £16,661,902 £17,035,672 £16,754,171

Looking at the average income per submitted staff member may help to give a better understanding of the funding distribution across the three different groupings. Again looking at the 2012/13 year the £111,474 average income of a Russell Group staff member is 1.93 times that of the other universities and 3.63 times that of a Post-92 staff member. Taking all 67 of the non Russell Group institutions the average staff member research income of £45,878 is 2.43 times less than a Russell Group member.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Staff
RG £102,087 £100,311 £98,643 £102,553 £111,474 912
Non RG £44,954 £47,069 £50,781 £46,921 £45,878 1246
Other £59,640 £61,509 £66,587 £59,183 £57,728 700
Post-92 £26,126 £28,556 £30,516 £31,201 £30,685 546

The average income per school\department may be seen below as is clearly evident the research income of a Russell Group institution is on average 10.2 times greater than a Post-92 school\department and 3.43 times more an the other 30 university schools\departments.

2008-09  2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Institutions
RG Average £4,231,970 £4,158,359 £4,089,208 £4,251,301 £4,621,093 22
Non RG  Avg £836,018 £875,343 £944,371 £872,589 £853,189 67
Other Avg £1,391,610 £1,435,216 £1,553,698 £1,380,927 £1,346,982 30
Avg for Post 92 £385,539 £421,393 £450,322 £460,424 £452,815 37

Scotland
Looking closer at Scotland which had 12 submitted institutions two of these Russell Group universities – Edinburgh and Glasgow account for most of the funding income. As can be seen below the research funding gap between 2008 and 2012 has been narrowing between Edinburgh\Glasgow and the other 10 institutions. In 2008 the difference was 1.69 this has now reduced in 2012 to 1.05 times that of Edinburgh\Glasgow for the remaining funds. The bottom row in the table below shows the average income received across the 10 non Russell Group institutions.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Institutions
RG Scotland £15,711,247 £14,353,304 £12,432,224 £10,609,597 £12,416,813 2
Non RG Scotland £9,256,211 £9,931,075 £10,802,991 £10,549,218 £11,780,157 10
Non RG Avg £925,621 £993,108 £1,080,299 £1,054,922 £1,178,016

Looking further into the breakdown the table below highlights the research income awarded to each type of university, Post-92 (4), Other (6) and Russell Group (2) within Scotland. As can be seen the Russell Group brought in roughly 5.1 times the income of the Post-92 sector, whilst the “Other” group brought in about 3.83 times that of the Post-92 institutions.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Institutions
Scotland Post-92 £1,932,190 £2,115,600 £2,138,764 £2,341,638 £2,436,902 4
Scotland Other £7,324,021 £7,815,475 £8,664,227 £8,207,580 £9,343,255 6
Scotland RG £15,711,247 £14,353,304 £12,432,224 £10,609,597 £12,416,813 2
Scotland Total £24,967,458 £24,284,379 £23,235,215 £21,158,815 £24,196,970 12

Calculating the average research income for each category of university yields the following table below.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Institutions
Scotland Post-92 £483,048 £528,900 £534,691 £585,410 £609,226 4
Scotland Other £1,220,670 £1,302,579 £1,444,038 £1,367,930 £1,557,209 6
Scotland RG £7,855,624 £7,176,652 £6,216,112 £5,304,799 £6,208,407 2

The table below outlines the research income for the 12 institutions in Scotland submitted to REF. They have been ordered according to total research income over the five year period with Edinburgh on top with an income of just over £50M accounting for 43.02% of the Scottish total research income. This is followed by Glasgow again with a eight figure total income of £14M for the 5 years of REF accounting for 12.59% of the Scottish total.

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
Edinburgh £11,782,758 £10,646,353 £9,715,972 £8,406,203 £10,140,922
Glasgow £3,928,489 £3,706,951 £2,716,252 £2,203,394 £2,275,891
Heriot-Watt £1,193,172 £1,487,196 £2,041,984 £2,253,042 £2,386,225
Dundee £1,893,382 £2,162,972 £1,932,633 £1,582,233 £1,790,045
Aberdeen £1,310,316 £1,393,901 £1,741,994 £1,772,829 £2,678,515
St Andrews £1,496,331 £1,389,019 £1,540,910 £1,602,031 £1,501,825
Edinburgh Napier £858,647 £669,439 £683,900 £1,219,476 £1,304,373
Strathclyde £822,758 £937,109 £968,227 £615,779 £303,535
Stirling £608,062 £445,278 £438,479 £381,666 £671,110
UWS £393,000 £744,000 £548,000 £299,000 £425,000
RGU £418,237 £395,480 £401,576 £518,756 £504,205
Glasgow Caledonian £262,306 £306,681 £505,288 £304,406 £215,324
Scotland Year Total £24,967,458 £24,284,379 £23,235,215 £21,158,815 £24,196,970

The 5 year total research income percentage of the Scottish total research income, REF Score and number of submitted staff may be seen in the table below. Many articles may be seen online discussing a strong relation between research income and REF score, yet as can be seen below several institutions with a lower research income have performed better than others in terms of REF score.

5 Year Total % of 5 Yr Total REF Score Staff Submitted
Edinburgh £50,692,208 43.02% 3.20 104
Glasgow £14,830,977 12.59% 3.10 43
Heriot-Watt £9,361,619 7.94% 2.65 29
Dundee £9,361,265 7.94% 2.75 13
Aberdeen £8,897,555 7.55% 2.90 20
St Andrews £7,530,116 6.39% 2.70 24
Edinburgh Napier £4,735,835 4.02% 2.00 12
Strathclyde £3,647,408 3.10% 2.55 21
Stirling £2,544,595 2.16% 2.40 16
UWS £2,409,000 2.04% 2.00 14
RGU £2,238,254 1.90% 2.35 19
Glasgow Caledonian £1,594,005 1.35% 1.80 13
Scotland Total £117,842,837

RGU Computing Alumni Group Reaches 700 Members

As the title says, the School of Computing Science and Digital Media Linkedin Alumni Group (Online) has reached 700 members.
Previous posts
Alumni Group Reaches 303 Members (Online)
School of Computing RGU Alumni Group Reaches 200 Members (Online)

The following embedded tweets should give some sense of how the Group has grown over the past few years.

Riverside East Extension – April 2015 Update

I have made a number of posts charting the progress of the extension to Riverside East at the Garthdee Campus of Robert Gordon University. All the exterior work is essentially complete with the addition of some concrete steps in the past few days. As you can see from the previous posts and the images below, the extension is moving along and should be ready for use this summer.

Blog Post: The First Few Months, commenced January 2014
Blog Post: Building the Steel Frame
Blog Post: Pouring the Floors and Cladding

Blog Post: Riverside East – Phase 1 Completion July 2013

October 2014
Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

November 2014
Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

December 2014
Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

April 2015
Extension to Riverside East

Extension to Riverside East

2015 04 23 RSE Extension

2015 04 23 RSE Extension

2015 04 23 RSE Extension

24 Camera Raspberry Pi – Bullet Time Photography

In a recent post I mentioned about helping out some students developing a tutorial on Quadcopters as part of their coursework for a 3rd year module of mine called Interactive Multimedia.

This post is about another group of students who worked on building and coding a Raspberry Pi based Bullet Time rig – again for the same module. The idea for this came from Dr. Andrew Robinson who had built a 48 Camera system with a PiFace Control and Display (Online). It would have been great had it been possible to demonstrate the system at the recent 24 Hour Hackathon just a few days before but time and space didn’t really allow for that to happen, so here’s some info about the rig instead.

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Initial development was carried out just on a single Raspberry Pi, once the image was successfully captured and transmitted it was then up-scaled to work with four Pi’s. The next phase of testing was with around ten Pi’s, and all seemed to work well. Some tweaking to the code was carried to speed up the capture / transfer process from the initial small scale tests. The afternoon of Wednesday 22nd April came the time to do a larger scale test of the system – with the submission date for the coursework just a few days away. Hence 24 Raspberry Pi’s were gathered together and configured for a larger scale test, as you see here.

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

To allow space and plenty of power sockets to get the system running the 24 Camera Raspberry Pi – Bullet Time system was setup in our Green Room / Motion Capture Room. The following images run in reverse chronological order, firstly show the Bullet Time Rig in use, and works back to setting things up. The very first capture test conducted was flying a paper plane through the capture space. Followed by tossing ten empty power supply boxes for the Raspberry Pi’s into the capture space along with a few other ideas too.

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Would be really great to try building a larger size version of the rig as the software is capturing from all 24 cameras and transferring to the Computer in just a few seconds. Perhaps something on the order of 75 cameras or more mounted on a laser cut stand with some 3D printed elements to secure the cameras and Raspberry Pi’s in place would be ideal with a diameter of around six meters. Such a rig should provide a good opportunity for capturing some really interesting shots. Its likely that the software developed will be placed on GitHub fairly soon, and may have another post or two showing some of the actual generated output. All one needs to build this rig is some Cameras, Raspberry Pi’s, network cables, a switch and the software.

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Reviewing one of the very first video files generated by the system.
Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Checking that the Pi’s were connected up and in communication.
Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Making use of a 48 port switch to get things going.
Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

We had some visitors too, who popped by to take a look at the setup.
Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Initially the system was setup to make use of two 24 port switches, though with the choice of having to do some switch reconfiguration or just using a larger switch, the 48 port switch option was taken, and perhaps made for a more interesting cable layout scheme!
Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Raspberry Pi Bullet Time Rig

Quadcopter Flights Around Campus

As I was dropping some gear back to our support team yesterday morning after the weekends RGU Hackathon, they queried if I would be able to assist some of my students with their coursework for a module I teach titled “Interactive Multimedia” – their task being to research, design, develop a presentation, video and interactive and tutorial on how to setup and fly a Quadcopter. Generally we require our students to get a good few training sessions before being left to fly the Quadcopters all by themselves.

Given it was such a lovely morning with clear blue skies and no wind, it was absolutely perfect conditions for some Quadcoptering. So we grabbed one of the Schools DJI Phantom Quadcopters, some batteries and went out to a few locations around campus to grab some footage of the Quadcopter setup and operation. The following images below should give you some idea of the morning we had. I must say that all the landings were perfectly executed. Was a great morning to be outside too, rather than stuck in front of a computer screen and keyboard.

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

2015 04 21 Quadcopter on Campus

24 Hour RGU Hackathon 18–19th April 2015

On the weekend of 18–19th April 2015 RGU’s first 24 hour Hackathon took place. Registration began on the Saturday morning at 10:00 with a total of 31 persons registering to take part on the day. At 11:00 and overview of the Challenges were given and a chance for team forming to take place. The challenges set out were in the general areas of working with hardware, data visualisation and SIE challenges. Hardware use took the form of gear such as the Myo Gesture Based Controller, Galileo Board and the Leap Motion. The second challenge on data visualisation was to make use of readily available data sets, examples included visualizing.org, open NASA data sets (over 9000 data sets available) and Twitter. The final challenge area was from the Scottish Institute for Enterprise (SIE) with areas such as Health and Wellbeing, Green and sustainable energy resources and Smarter communities and infrastructure. Next on the agenda was lunch, in the form of around 20 Pizzas, all being devoured in a matter of minutes giving plenty of time to get organised and start coding exactly at 13:00 when the 24 hour countdown clock was started. The image below will take you to a Facebook Photo Album of the event.

Facebook RGUHack 2015 Album

The next 24 hours was all about coding coding and coding, with the odd few people taking a quick power nap here and there. During this period there were a few breaks at 18:00 for Dinner, midnight for Late Dinner and 08:00 for Breakfast. Twenty four hours later the countdown clock finally reached Zero at 13:00 on Sunday 19th April signalling the end of the hacking session. It was then time for a spot of lunch, and on to the presentation of the work undertaken by all the teams. Things finally finished up around 15:30 or so with a good number of prizes being awarded and everybody having had a great time. The organisers had everything packed up and the venue put back to normal by around 17:00.

All in all it was a great event with many of the organisers / participants not sleeping for around 40 hours or so. Many people got up around 05:30 to 06:30 on the Saturday morning and didn’t get to bed until 10:00 or after on the Sunday night. Many managed to get through the entire event without even a short nap, just a handful took some powernaps of 1 to two hours, with the odd one or two napping for around 3 hours – leaving still plenty of time for coding.

Photos and Tweets were generated by many of the attendees and organisers, right throughout the event. One can see quite a few tweets available from eventifier.com. Of the nine teams took part with eight surviving to the very end.

Well done to the Organisers
Well done to the student team who put in so much time and effort into organising, planning and hosting the event. Hopefully RGUHack 2.0 will not be too far away and will also be bigger and better. Perhaps the RGUCompSoc that has been quiet for the past 18 months may reform and come back with a series of mini hackathons, to get some hackathon coding practice and perhaps organise a few other events too.

Thanks should be mentioned to all the Office and Support staff who helped with booking the venue / sorting out the hardware. Thanks to the Academics who popped in during the event as well, – in order of appearance: Roger, John, Sean, Robin and Mathew, a particular thanks to John who provided some Intel Galileo Boards that were used by several teams & and was also present right throughout the night, keeping busy playing GTA V.

Student Tasks
Stan Main organiser and event host
Ross Radio, press, shopping, and generally helping out during the event
Alex AV systems, generally helping out during the event, judging panel, reception desk
Haroldas Website
Eimantas Wireless access
Lewis Event Photographer

Online Coverage
Hackathon Website (http://rguhack.uk/)
Twitter (https://twitter.com/RGUHack)
Facebook Photo Set (Online)
RGU Hack Facebook Page (Online)
Article in Press & Journal (Online)
Eventifier RGUHack 2015 (Online)
Eventifier RGUHack 2015 Twitter Contributors (Online)
Major League Hacking Website (Online)

The Teams, Projects & Winners

Team Project
Aberduino Developed quite an interesting app that was able to take input from a Myo Gesture Controlled Armband and display the type of gesture on LED Matrix display being controlled by an Arduino Board. One could readily build upon this to create some very interesting applications \ games using this alternative form of data input and processing.
Insomniac This team developed a Windows Phone Life Planner mobile App. The application had a number of screens including login, projects page, task list, schedule, friends signup. Overall the app had quite a user friendly and elegant design having the potential to be further developed.
Thinkstars Developed a Web App around one of the Scottish Institute for Enterprise Challenges. The main idea was to provide a site whereby one could learn about first aid techniques and home remedies to various ailments. It also included a Lifestyle survey feature to allow users to get a sense towards what degree of a healthy lifestyle they were leading.
Bits Please The project was designed around the idea of people moving to a new location. It provided a social environment where one could select language and location & could then find out info about the area, get to know others, and help improve one’s understanding of a foreign language.
Java The Hut Took on a Data Visualisation challenge, making use of a Leap Motion Controller and a data set on Meteor Strikes available from NASA. One was able to interact with Google Earth by making gesture movements in the vicinity of the Leap Motion such as swiping left/right to accordingly spin the globe around.The team also worked on a second app called “Snooze You Loose”, the idea being that once could take geotagged photos of where your sleep and give a rating. Such an app could be useful for those doing lots of travelling.
Gallilop IT The Gallilop IT group developed a version of Bop It making use of a good deal of electronics mounted on a breadboard attached to a Galileo Board.
Answerity Created a web based app whereby one could ask questions and get answer in return, on any topic of interest. The idea being simple questions that were location specific. Users could up-vote or down-vote particular answers depending on how useful they were. The project made use of many technologies including Javascript, Backbone, jQuery and Bootstrap to name but a few.
AbertayHackers This group looked at Data Mining tweets. They first looked at geotagged tweets but less than 5% of tweets seemed to include geotagged data, thus didn’t provide as much data as hoped. The team made use of cree.py in this task. Further work was done in the area of Sentiment Analysis looking for tweets that had a positive / negative meaning. A Python based web scraper was developed that allowed graphs to be generated giving an indication of the general positive/negative trend of specific search terms.

Winning Teams

Award Team Prize
1st Place AbertayHackers Dell Venue 8 Tablets & MLH Medals
2nd Place Answerty Raspberry Pi Model B
Special Mention Aberduino 8 Pack Redbull
Special Mention Bits Please 24 Pack Coke

Before and After Group Photos

Prizes and Presentations

Other Fun Tweets